FIVE QUESTIONS THAT MAKE YOU A GREAT SPEAKER

FIVE QUESTIONS THAT MAKE YOU A GREAT SPEAKER

In a world where attention is King. Communication is queen!

The need for each and every human being to be good at communication can’t be overstated. Let’s think about it for a second; if you have a great idea and you need your team to understand it you need to be a great communicator if you are in a relationship and you are having certain challenges in order to communicate them without them getting hurt you need to be a good communicator and last but not least if you have children and you want them to be influenced by your own experiences, you need to be a good communicator.

This though is coupled with a sad dichotomy of a world that does not take time to hone these skills.  A world to comfortable in its ways rather than looking for a higher form of communication.  If you need to convince a room of people to hear you and to understand you, you are in the right place. How do we start? Ask yourself

What is my unique and meaningful connection to the presentation?

When you know your connection to something you become passionate about it. This is since you find a relationship with the topic. It’s no longer just about delivering the presentation it’s about getting people to connect with you and your relationship with the topic.

What story can I tell about this?

Stories have been shown to sync the mind of the audience with the mind of the speaker. As a result, every presentation you make needs to have a story that you can associate the presentation with. When you do this you convince people not only through the mind but through the heart.  The best presenters take about 65% of their presentation time telling a story.

If my presentation was a conversation how would I speak?

Design your presentation like having a conversation. This helps you to ensure the pace of your speech is not too fast for your audience. Secondly it is a great way to map out your interaction with the audience. A conversation has a response and since you start this conversation you are mapping out your audience’s response and then your next line of conversation. The presentation starts flowing into each other as you keep answering and asking questions designed for your audience. As you do this the audience feels involved.

What is new about your presentation?

For evolutionary purposes, the human brain has been wired to find what looks new in an environment. The mind is always looking for novelty.  As you prepare for that presentation put this in mind. What new thing did you find out as you prepared for the presentation? How new will it be to your audience? How can you present it in a new way? This is what has your audience saying, WOW!

What shocking thing did you find out that you would like to share with your audience?

If you are Billy Gates, the shocking thing will be that most white people don’t know how a mosquito feels like. Yet they are the biggest drivers of malaria donor funding.  So what did he do? He opened a jar of mosquitoes as he did a presentation on Malaria.

The shocking thing creates an emotionally charged event. It makes your audience susceptible to learning. They ask themselves what next?

When you do this your audience has no other option but to connect with the passion in your story, see and feel the authenticity as you speak to them, feel involved in the presentation although only one person is speaking, know something they never knew and finally be so shocked about what you realized they ask themselves where have they been before your presentation?

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