Acera

Acera

 

 

ACERA.

My walkway was the street of Takie, Ogbomoso. The night was still young as it was few minutes past 8’o clock and the street was rough and muddy as were in the rainy season. Cars, bikes, and trucks were struggling to stay on the good side of the road as it was filled with ditches and potholes. Takie is one busy part of Ogbomoso as it houses the park where most travelers coming into Ogbomoso alight, the biggest bookstore, and most of the banks are situated in that area.

 As I alighted from the cab, I was frightened because it was dark, and I could barely see. It wouldn’t make sense to bring out my phone to light my way as the night was still young and people were much on the street, so I kept it in my pocket. Something dropped into my mind, why not see this as your first grand entrance. Walk the way you would on the walkway. I grabbed the opportunity!

I was putting on a long-sleeved chiffon shirt, a high waist jean, a flat-soled shoe, and an oversized jean jacket to let out the cold—I was on my way to a vigil. Immediately I agreed with myself to do the walk, I adjusted my backpack, dipped my hands into the pocket of my jean to maintain a good stance, paused for few minutes to check myself for any other adjustments and I also looked up to see the moon—I noticed the beautiful crescent while in the cab. It had a star underneath it and it looked exactly like the short clip that comes up before any Disney Animated movie. 

Head up. Emotions crossed. Eyes forward. Left leg, then right… It was my first walk—sort of—as I was as careful as I can be lest I miss a step. A few steps forward, I noticed little boys were following me, they were bout three or four—I wasn’t sure of their number. They were talking and laughing out loud, aunty yi maa fine (this aunty is fine), wo bi won se n rin (look at the way she is walking), won rin bii queen (she is walking like a queen). On hearing their comments, I smiled and looked back. They noticed I heard them conversing and they skied off. 

The street was filled with dirt and dust and people. On the roadside, a woman, assisted by a little child was frying akara (beancake) and had eko (solid cereal porridge) by her side. Another woman sat beside her and they engaged themselves in petty talks. A mad man stood in front of them and asked to be given something to eat. As I walked past them, I said I silent prayer of appreciation to God for my current state and where He is taking me to. 

I lost balance when a cab wanted to park close to me and I wasn’t aware because the cab driver didn’t horn. I gave the driver a scornful glance and waited till he continued his drive. While waiting, I checked the time and I realized I still have more time before the vigil starts—the vigil was to kick start by 10 pm and it was some minutes past 8 when I checked the time. Before I continued the walk, still on the same spot, I imagined how living a luxurious life would be—having people at your beck and call, getting invited to top-notch events and parties, wearing designers and getting adorned with beautiful things. I also imagined how difficult it’ll be to deal with fans, gossips, and rumors. We’ll know how to deal with it when we get there, I concluded, and I continued with my walk.

There was no makeup, fashion designers, flashlight, camera, and audience to complement my walk but it was fun. As I crossed to the other side of the road with the church in view, let’s do this again, I said to myself, with a big grin on my face. 

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