MARCH 25 – TOMORROW IN PARADISE

MARCH 25 - TOMORROW IN PARADISE

NB: THIS IS A SEQUEL. To access the previous episode, click here

MARCH 25 – Tomorrow in Paradise

“Tomorrow is in God’s hands,” said Nonso as he ended the telephone conversation. He was woken by Kamsioma, his younger sister, around 4 o’clock in the morning. Kamsi called to confirm if truly the deadly virus was in Lagos State. News had gotten to her of the index case, but she must hear from the horse’s mouth — as if Nonso was the only one authorised to divulge news from Lagos. There was hope in her tone as she greeted, “Otutu ọma.”

The conversation lasted for twenty minutes. After exchange of pleasantries, Nonso gave an expert scrutiny of the situation in Lagos to his sister. He spoke about the mental aftermath of the current lockdown and its effect on the church of Christ. He compared it to the days of Noah in the Bible. “God will save those that are His,” he said. “God kept Noah and his family for forty days and forty nights. He will surely keep me and my family too,” he proclaimed. Kamsi responded, “Amen.”

He fussed about things he would normally ignore. “Ndi Yoruba n’emekaa uzu,” he confessed. The noise from his neighbours was becoming intolerable each day. He also complained about the electricity distribution company. He noticed that they only supplied electricity between the hours of 8 o’clock in the evening and 7 o’clock of the next morning. For this reason, his neighbours switch on their generators which disturb him throughout the day.

It has been a frustrating week for Nonso already. He couldn’t attend the usual Wednesday praise and worship meeting. On March 25, as he picked up his Bible to meditate, he opened the book of Matthew chapter six. “Take no thought for tomorrow: for tomorrow shall take thought for the things of itself,” he read aloud. After reading this, Nonso was assured that if tomorrow never comes he would be in a quiet and peaceful paradise with his God.

©Jonathan Ukor 2020
#31DaywritingChallenge

Glossary

  1. “Otutu ọma” (good morning) 
  2. “Ndi Yoruba n’emekaa uzu” (The Yorubas are noisy people)

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